Uutiset

Here's our evening round-up of the latest coronavirus news from Finland – Wednesday

Latest virus figures
Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus (L), Director General of the World Health Organization (WHO), sits next to Maria van Kerkhove (2-L) Technical Lead of WHO's Health Emergencies programme, during a new press conference on the coronavirus disease COVID-19, in Geneva, Switzerland, 09 March 2020. On 14 April, US President Trump announced that he has instructed his administration to halt funding to the WHO. Kuva: epa08363672
Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus (L), Director General of the World Health Organization (WHO), sits next to Maria van Kerkhove (2-L) Technical Lead of WHO's Health Emergencies programme, during a new press conference on the coronavirus disease COVID-19, in Geneva, Switzerland, 09 March 2020. On 14 April, US President Trump announced that he has instructed his administration to halt funding to the WHO. Kuva: epa08363672

Latest coronavirus figures

The Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare THL says there have been 2,038 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Finland – an increase of 76 from the day before. More than half of the cases are Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital District.

So far 72 patients have died from Covid-19.

Laboratories are testing more than 4,000 samples every day, and THL says that ”testing capacity is constantly increasing.”

At present there are 226 people in hospital around the country being treated for coronavirus symptoms, and 75 are in intensive care.

Uusimaa lockdown ends early

The government has ending the restrictions on travel in and out of Uusimaa region earlier than planned. The partial lockdown was due to expire on Sunday 19th April but on Wednesday morning ministers announced that roadblocks would end almost immediately.

The decision was taken primarily on legal grounds, since the conditions for imposing them in the first place no longer exist. At the time the travel restrictions were introduced there was a much higher number of coronavirus infections in the southern region, and authorities wanted to slow its spread to other parts of the country.

However the decision has also likely been taken on resource grounds – maintaining dozens of checkpoints on roads around the region of roughly 1.7 million people has put a strain on police resources, even with conscripts brought in to help.

However, the government is still urging people who live in Uusimaa not to make a dash for the exit but to stick to the lockdown conditions anyway.

Finnish healthcare workers vital in northern Sweden

Every day dozens of Finnish healthcare workers cross over the northern border into Sweden, and at the end of their shifts return home again to self-isolation.

They’re part of a small number of international travelers who don’t need to go into mandatory quarantine when they arrive in Finland, as their roles are vital to keep the Norrbotten hospital system functioning during the coronavirus pandemic.

”If the Finns can’t come into our region then we must close healthcare facilities” says Anna-Stina Nordmark Nilsson, the Regional Director of Healthcare in Norrbotten.

Tornio-based cardiologist Kjell Melander says that when healthcare staff go home to Finland after their shifts they have to sign paperwork at the border promising not to be in places where they might spread coronavirus, and basically go into self-isolation during their time off. Read more.

Finland pledges €5.5 extra to cover Trump WHO budget cut

The Finnish government has pledged to increase its funding for the World Health Organisation by €5.5 million, to help cover a shortfall after US President Donald Trump announced on Tuesday evening that he was suddenly stopping America’s contributions over a disagreement with China.

In addition, Finland already gave a one-off million euro grant to the WHO for it’s Covid-19 response plan.

Foreign Minister Pekka Haavisto (Green) says that if Europe gets control of the pandemic, other parts of the world like Africa and Latin America will need the WHO’s help and expertise to tackle the virus.

Meanwhile Finland will also be increasing its humanitarian aid to help agencies who are working with some of the world’s most vulnerable communities in crisis zones such as refugee camps in the Middle East and Africa.

Turku University grant to help coronavirus anxiety in children

Researchers at the University of Turku have been awarded a €50,000 grant to help families and especially children who develop anxiety during the coronavirus crisis.

The money was given by the Juho Vainio Foundation to a research team lead by Andre Sourander, a professor of child psychiatry.

”The impact of large-scale crisis on children’s mental well-being is significantly influenced by their parents’ ability to control their own feelings and support the children’s good mental health” says Professor Sourander, who has developed some tools to help parents deal with their own anxiety and their children’s as well.

Professor Sourander and his team have years of experience in designing and researching digital, mental health-promoting programmes.

Foreign Ministry staff help Kela handle claims

Fifty civil servants from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs will begin a three month temporary work assignment for Kela, helping them process a backlog of benefits claims.

The Foreign Ministry staff all have a background in handling visa applications.

“Visa officers already have skills that are also useful in resolving benefit applications. This is a unique example of cross-administrative cooperation” says Pasi Lankinen from Kela.

The visa staff will receive training before starting to handle Kela benefit paperwork.

The full stories and more can be read here: www.newsnowfinland.fi

Daily news about the coronavirus crisis – koronauutiset englanniksi

Luotettavan tiedon tarve on kasvanut koronakriisin jatkuessa. Kaikkia maakuntamme asukkaita ei suomen- tai ruotsinkielinen media tavoita. Siksi julkaisemme koronakriisin aikana joka ilta englanninkielisen uutiskoosteen päivän tapahtumista. Uusi kooste ilmestyy luettavaksi maanantaista perjantaihin kello 19.30.

Englanninkielinen kooste koronauutisista kertoo nimenomaan päivän tiedoista ja tapahtumista Suomessa. Aineiston tuottaa Lännen Median lehtien käyttöön englanninkielinen uutispalvelu News Now Finland.

As the coronavirus crisis continues our readers have an increased need for reliable information. Not all residents of our region are reached by Finnish or Swedish-language media. That’s why we’ve started to publish an English-language news summary of the day’s coronavirus news. The new round-up will be available online Monday through Friday at 7:30pm.

The English-language compilation of coronavirus news has the latest information related to Finland. The material is produced for Lännen Media publications by the English-language news service News Now Finland.

Uusimmat

Näkoislehti

26.9.2020

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